Tuesday, August 26, 2014

The Cold, Hard Facts About the ALS Ice Bucket Challenge

It seems many people still don't realize that the ALS Association (ALSA) condones and uses Embryonic Stem Cell research - and thus negates the ALSA as potential recipients of our charitable efforts.

Last week I authored a piece, Throwing Cold Water on the ALS Ice Bucket Challenge, over on Catholic Stand. As it was shared in Facebook-land and other social media, it spurred quite the reaction. Some comments were expected, others came as a surprise. All in all the responses have been good.

There are a couple of things that I hope readers will take away from my presentation of the facts surrounding the charitable assistance owed to all of those who suffer from ALS or any other debilitating, life threatening disease - an ethical cure should never come at the expense of the life of another.

Here are the Cold, Hard Facts about the ALS Ice Bucket Challenge in a nutshell: 



  • The ALS Association (ALSA), which initiated the ALS Ice Bucket Challenge, supports Embryonic Stem Cell Research.
  • Embryonic Stem Cell Research kills tiny human beings, who were created for experimentation. 
  • This is considered to be one of the intrinsic evils by the Catholic Church.
  • ALS victims deserve our compassion and research to end this horrible disease is a worthy cause.
  • There are ethical alternatives to the ALSA, such as the John Paul II Medical Research Institute.
  • The John Paul II Medical Research Institute does NOT support or use Embryonic Stem Cell Research.
  • If you choose to accept the ALS Ice Bucket Challenge, please designate your donation to the John Paul II Medical Research Institute or another moral/ethical organizations.
  • American Life League has a vast list devoted to informing readers about the morality of most large charities. You might be surprised at which ones (and how many) are unethical.
  • Catholic bishops, from dioceses such as the archdiocese of Cincinnati, are accepting the ALS Ice Bucket Challenge and publicly spotlighting their support for the ethical research being done by the John Paul II Medical Research Institute. They are alerting their flocks to the moral repugnance of Embryonic Stem Cell Research.
As Catholic Christians, we are morally bound to practice morally discerned charity. It's our duty to know the moral stance of those to whom we donate. A little bit of research or asking a pro-life organization, such as American Life League, will easily give you the answers you need. Whether you choose to give privately or via a public event, always remember to care enough to make sure your giving is morally sound.